Nick Lees: 75-year-old Edmonton woman climbs 3,543-metre Mt. Temple in support of E4C


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Her first major climb was in 2015 when she stood atop Tanzanian’s 5,895-metre Mt. Kilimanjaro, Africa’s highest mountain.

In 2017, she hiked to Mt. Everest’s 5,364-metre South Everest base camp in Nepal and the following year she was nearing the 3,954-metre summit of Mt. Robson, the highest peak in the Canadian Rockies, when weather drove her party down.

“It’s an eye opener to go to a school to help serve lunch and see how many youngsters are so hungry they come back for seconds or thirds.” says Kujundzic.

She has now climbed 65 peaks, with no plans to quit.

“I have become more aware of superb climbs in our Rocky Mountains,” says Kujundzic. “I envisage more expeditions to help needy school children.”

UPLOADED BY: Nick Lees ::: EMAIL: nleesyeg@gmail.com ::: PHONE: 7808034812 ::: CREDIT: Nick Lees ::: CAPTION: Retired chartered accountant Bob Britnell has encountered everything from grizzly bears to tricky river crossings in the 140,000 kilometres he has logged in his 48 years of horseback riding, but says the greatest risk to his personal safety is bicycle riders who come up behind him at high speed and making no noise.
Retired chartered accountant Bob Britnell has encountered everything from grizzly bears to tricky river crossings in the 140,000 kilometres he has logged in his 48 years of horseback riding, but says the greatest risk to his personal safety is bicycle riders who come up behind him at high speed and making no noise.

Look out for horseback riders

Bob Brintnell has ridden some 140,000 kilometres on horseback and encountered both grizzly and black bears, wolves, moose, rutting elk, tricky river crossings and perilous trails.

“In my 48 years on the trail I recently encountered the greatest risk to my personal safety — bicycle riders,” says the retired chartered accountant.

“Riding in ditches along paved roads west of the Devon Highway, I have almost daily encountered cyclists coming up behind my horse at high speed and making no noise whatsoever.

“When my horse senses such activity, he puts a major shy on me. This constitutes a serious threat to my personal safety. Should I hit the ground, I could easily sustain serious injury.”

Brintnell, presently living on the Bighorn reservation west of Nordegg and riding trails off the David Thompson Highway, says most cyclists are oblivious to the risk they pose to horseback riders.

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